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A series of mistakes leads to a deadly collision between two criminals and a drug kingpin in Clark Duke’s directorial debut ‘Arkansas.’

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Think of ‘The Wretched’ as the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of horror: you’re unlikely to be surprised by what you’re getting, but you’ll certainly take it in without any complaint.

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‘Deerskin’ is a brutally weird movie with a rambling narrative that often feels more interested in its thematic elements than its plot and character ones.

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Dan Bush’s ‘The Dark Red’ is definitely watchable, but almost infuriating in how little it seems to regard its tonal shifts. Rather than “yes, and,” it chooses instead to go for “and then,” switching from one genre to another, choosing to keep the various aspects distinctly and ineffectively separate.

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While these docs all stand on their own, as binged series, the interconnectedness of all these titles, genres, and personages come together in a very gratifying way.

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Kirill Sokolov’s ‘Why Don’t You Just Die!’ is an astonishingly well-constructed piece of filmmaking, and the sort of movie destined to become necessary viewing for anyone who likes a chuckle with their shotgun blasts.

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In the end, nothing is truly gained from watching this. I don’t see the point in timing this around the unofficial marijuana “holiday” of 4/20. This was more of a bad trip than anything else.

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In these unprecedented times, Amazon Prime’s ‘Selah and the Spades’ is a breath of fresh air we all need.

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A 30-something woman navigating through love and heartbreak over the course of one year.

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This is a great film for the Fantastic Fest audience and those who love twisted humor.

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Interesting, though a bit fragmented during its final 10-15 minutes, ‘The Quarry’ feels like Cormac McCarthy Lite.

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Marc Meyers’ heavy metal horror flick ‘We Summon the Darkness’ starts strong, but soon turns into a standard stalk-and-slash.

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A Carpe Diem fever dream about love, loss, failure, fate, and time travel, ‘Same Boat’ is a delightful little surprise.

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A sci-fi suspense thriller that’s as interesting as it is ambitious, Vivarium probes the evolving nature of the human condition and notions of “home.”

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Bill Nighy and Annette Bening give masterful performances in William Nicholson’s new divorce drama. The characters aren’t always likable, but the lead’s performances will keep you entertained throughout.

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