Warren Cantrell

Molly Shannon is interviewed by Warren before Q&A and screening of ‘Other People’ at the Seattle International Film Festival!

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Although Finding Kim does a great job filling in the blank spaces of its primary subject’s life with friend interviews, along with other transitioned folks, the answer to this question remains elusive.

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‘The Weekend Sailor’ isn’t a hard-hitting investigation or a thought-provoking exploration of anything beyond what can happen when you believe in yourself and your dreams. Although this might leave some people wanting, for those looking for an entertaining, feel-good story with a cast of colorful characters, this documentary fits the bill.

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Anna Kendrick and Sam Rockwell do a decent enough job carrying the picture’s premise, yet they struggle under the weight of the ludicrous madness that bogs down the final act.

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The Lance Armstrong biopic ‘The Program’ is engaging and interesting, yet doesn’t add anything new to a narrative that has enjoyed exhaustive media coverage.

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There’s little fault to find in Coming Home, which tells a heartbreaking story using components of a cultural upheaval that most of the world, China included, knows little about.

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Director Justin Kurzel has managed to craft a film adaptation of Macbeth that is simultaneously beautiful, terrifying, and gripping, and elevates the source material to unprecedented heights.

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Post image for Top 10 Movie Witches

Top 10 Movie Witches

by Warren Cantrell on February 16, 2016

in Top 10s

Director Robert Eggers’ The Witch opens in wide release this week, so it seems as good a time as any to get down to the serious business of ranking witches in film.

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Like a long marriage, 45 Years isn’t an easy journey by any means, yet it is one definitely worth taking.

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Were it anyone else but Charlie Kaufman holding the reins on this, things might not seem so generic and adrift, yet again, considering the level of novelty and creativity he has brought to previous offerings, Anomalisa feels decidedly thin, and only partially formed.

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Those that don’t have the capacity to find some sliver of perverse humor in point-blank headshots, projectile blood vomiting, aggressive rape scenes, and cold blooded murder probably won’t like The Hateful Eight. That’s their loss, though, for the rest of us that have followed Tarantino on his cinematic gallop through the last 20-plus years have come to expect nothing less, and in the director’s eighth offering, he most certainly does not disappoint.

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Although there are discernible arcs and some level of growth for a few of the characters, ‘Youth’ is all so on-the-nose and force-fed that the whole affair comes off as decidedly manufactured and plastic.

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An expertly crafted drama with impeccable performances, a tight script, stunning set and costume designs, and a brisk yet thoughtful pace, director Todd Haynes’ newest film, Carol, soars.

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At nearly three hours, one laments the wasted opportunity, for there is ample time, directorial muscle, and acting horsepower to walk the line between cinematically engaging and broadly digestible.

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There’s an odd, weirdly cozy relationship between Christmas and crime, at least in cinema. Hollywood’s scribes churn out “holiday” films on the regular, and since conflict drives story, nefarious doings often get stirred into the plot-stew of Yuletide yarns. Today’s list ranks the various Christmas capers that have popped up in Christmas films throughout the years, and judged them based on their creativity, ultimate success, and quality of presentation.

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