Warren Cantrell

What happens when sports fail to bridge a cultural gap? That’s the question director Maya Zinshtein asks with her insightful and crushing documentary, Forever Pure, a powerful look at the intersection of 21st century race, politics, class, mob rule, and sports.

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A postmodern meditation on mental health and manic-pixie-dream-girl tropes, Entanglement has a lot of great ideas and slick moves, even if it does sometimes feel like 6 ounces of steak sitting alone on a 12-inch plate.

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This documentary explores the intersection of business and pleasure in Hollywood during its critical and financial heyday, with Alan Carr, the ultimate outsider, right in the middle of things.

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While one could take this whole story as an examination of religious extremism at its earliest stages, ‘The Student’ has little to say about what might be done to combat this in burgeoning adults.

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The Lost City of Z is an interesting movie about a handful of fascinating people who all play second fiddle to an A-plot that only partially comes together.

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Tommy’s Honour stars Jack Lowden as Tommy Morris Jr., a real-life 19th century Scottish golfer who is widely credited as the modern game’s first star.

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A brisk film at just under 90 minutes, Donald Cried feels like the two-headed love child of Manchester By the Sea and the Trailer Park Boys. It’s about loss, the reconciliation of past failures, and northeastern rubes with all the class of a carnival barker. Out now at Screenland Armour, Avedisian’s film is worth seeing as much for what it says as for what it doesn’t.

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Mean Dreams belongs to Bill Paxton, and speaks to a criminally underutilized dramatic talent now lost to the world.

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‘Brimstone’ is a decidedly unique and moving film that might not be for everyone, but is nevertheless engaging, gripping, and terrifying.

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‘Drifter’ meanders through its 85-minute runtime with characters that aren’t defined, in a universe with even less structure, barreling towards a hazy objective quickly discarded.

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‘Jackie’ is the story of one woman’s attempt to put the pieces of her life back together following an unspeakable tragedy, and what that means when one is doing it on the biggest, most public of stages.

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It takes a pretty serious set of balls to wade into the middle of a war, yet even this courage seems dwarfed by people doing so without the comfort of a weapon to protect themselves. Hacksaw Ridge tells the story of one such non-combatant, and today’s list celebrates the most notable medics and observers that military films have offered over the years. These are the characters that braved the bullets to be at the front, alongside active combatants to help either with their observations, or their life-saving actions.

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Based on Fredrik Backman’s novel of the same name, A Man Called Ove is the story of a man who might just as easily have fallen between life’s cracks were it not for the compassion of strangers willing to take a chance on the guy.

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‘Southside With You’ is an engaging, interesting peek into the lives of two influential people, played by a couple of actors who do a superb job slipping into characters much of the world knows quite well.

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Indignation is a smart, well-crafted story about young adulthood and what it means to be smart and stupid all at the same time.

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