Warren Cantrell

My Friend Dahmer is a slow burning examination of pure evil in its larval state.

{ 0 comments }

An ultraviolent yarn about a rage-inducing plague confined to a corporate office tower, ‘Mayhem’ is like Office Space crossed with Bruce Lee’s The Game of Death (the one with Kareem).

{ 0 comments }

Opening today, Blade of the Immortal is a fun, raucous, bloody love letter to samurai cinema, as well as an introspective examination of that genre’s most popular tropes. Come for the stabbings, stay for the ponderous postmodern critiques: it’s all delicious.

{ 0 comments }

Opening today at the Alamo Drafthouse, Tragedy Girls is a frothy yet black comedy that earns its R rating via several brutal murders and some barbed dialogue.

{ 0 comments }

A touching tribute to one of the most famous artists in western civilization, Loving Vincent does right by Vincent van Gogh, recounting the Dutch painter’s life story in an inventive and mesmerizing way.

{ 0 comments }

Unfocused, indulgent, and scattered, Human Flow, opening at the Tivoli Friday, doesn’t know what it wants to be, and has an even more difficult time trying to figure out what it wants to say.

{ 0 comments }

Few actors could lay claim to a more storied and dynamic a career, so it seems perfect that Harry Dean Stanton would go out giving a performance about an old man’s triumphant claim of victory on a life well lived.

{ 0 comments }

Writer/director Ryan Eggold is toying with some interesting stuff with all this, yet the emotional and thematic dots just don’t quite connect.

{ 0 comments }

Opening this week at the Screenland at Tapcade after a successful run in the festival circuit, Zoology is a headscratcher, but an admittedly interesting one. What it lacks in thematic focus it almost makes up for with its concept and fantastic cast…almost.

{ 0 comments }

A quiet, cerebral meditation on poverty, adolescence, gang culture, and “family,” Dayveon tells a complicated story in a startlingly accessible way. Opening Sept. 22 at the Screenland at Tapcade.

{ 0 comments }

‘Second Nature’ is a woefully under-baked concept set in an absurd world that is entirely disconnected from reality.

{ 0 comments }

Anchored by the performance of Lake Bell, who also wrote and directed the picture, I Do…Until I Don’t (opening today) recycles the mockumentary formula yet never comes off as redundant or familiar: an admirable feat, to say the least.

{ 0 comments }

Pilgrimage does a fine job side-stepping expectations and injects some 21st century life into a 13th century story.

{ 0 comments }

After Love transcends culture and language to tell a story that is as universal as the very concept of love itself. Come for the drama, stay for the humanity: it’s worth it.

{ 0 comments }

For non-New Yorkers looking for something more than just a car-wash-style march through the sitcom talking points of young adulthood and infidelity, ‘Landline’ might come off as somewhat lacking.

{ 0 comments }