Warren Cantrell

Like a long marriage, 45 Years isn’t an easy journey by any means, yet it is one definitely worth taking.

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Were it anyone else but Charlie Kaufman holding the reins on this, things might not seem so generic and adrift, yet again, considering the level of novelty and creativity he has brought to previous offerings, Anomalisa feels decidedly thin, and only partially formed.

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Those that don’t have the capacity to find some sliver of perverse humor in point-blank headshots, projectile blood vomiting, aggressive rape scenes, and cold blooded murder probably won’t like The Hateful Eight. That’s their loss, though, for the rest of us that have followed Tarantino on his cinematic gallop through the last 20-plus years have come to expect nothing less, and in the director’s eighth offering, he most certainly does not disappoint.

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Although there are discernible arcs and some level of growth for a few of the characters, ‘Youth’ is all so on-the-nose and force-fed that the whole affair comes off as decidedly manufactured and plastic.

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An expertly crafted drama with impeccable performances, a tight script, stunning set and costume designs, and a brisk yet thoughtful pace, director Todd Haynes’ newest film, Carol, soars.

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At nearly three hours, one laments the wasted opportunity, for there is ample time, directorial muscle, and acting horsepower to walk the line between cinematically engaging and broadly digestible.

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There’s an odd, weirdly cozy relationship between Christmas and crime, at least in cinema. Hollywood’s scribes churn out “holiday” films on the regular, and since conflict drives story, nefarious doings often get stirred into the plot-stew of Yuletide yarns. Today’s list ranks the various Christmas capers that have popped up in Christmas films throughout the years, and judged them based on their creativity, ultimate success, and quality of presentation.

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Today we celebrate every toker, smoker, and joker who ever had the mantle of responsibility thrust upon them in film, and rank them based on the success they experienced navigating their various situations.

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Today’s list is an exploration of all the known truths of the Terminator universe, for while the quality of each installment has varied over the years, certain commonalities have not.

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Feig’s ability to breathe fresh air into a somewhat stale concept bodes well for his and Ms. McCarthy’s expected reboot of the Ghostbusters franchise, which might very well succeed if it is as sharp and creative with its writing and comedy set pieces as Spy is.

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Currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, and riding high on the laurels won at Cannes and the Caesars (Adèle Haenel won Best Actress at both), Love at First Fight is a light, interesting, gorgeous, and ultimately successful take on the familiar rom-com standard.

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Currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, A Blast is anything but, and only hints at something potentially special beneath all the misshapen debris.

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Mr. Bacon’s time in Hollywood has been defined by humility, hard work, dedication to his craft, and a selfless commitment to every professional endeavor, big or small. As he worked the red carpet leading into Seattle’s historic Egyptian Theater, all of this professionalism and good-natured courtesy was on display.

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Showing at SIFF 2015 now, the doc License to Operate examines the volunteer organizations that have formed in L.A. in an effort to curb violence and create lasting lines of communications between the neighborhoods and civic officials (police included).

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In My Skinny Sister (Swedish: Min lilla syster), Swedish pre-teen Stella (Rebecka Josephson) is having a hard enough time navigating the minefield that is adolescence without the passive torment doled out by her big sister, Katja (Amy Deasismont).

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