Warren Cantrell

Phantom Thread oozes purpose with each scrap of its being, and represents some of the best work of Paul Thomas Anderson’s career (and some of the funniest).

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An accessible neo-noir with an all-star cast of reliable character actors, Small Town Crime is a fun watch, even if it never quite overcomes the formulaic elements cemented into its foundation

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The right movie for the right moment directed by the right man at the wrong time, The Post has a lot of interesting things to say, yet often gets in the way of itself when trying to say them.

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She might not have the expensive clothes and refined tastes of the other skaters, but her attitude, bearing, and the company she keeps is what will ultimately sink her. The question then becomes one of fate, and whether Tonya Harding ever really had a chance.

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The real-life story of a high-stakes poker organizer who got mixed up in a world of celebrities, Wall Street thugs, and mafia goons, Molly’s Game has a lot going for it, not to mention a few things going against.

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Opening this week, Alexander Payne’s ‘Downsizing’ is a refreshing yarn about love, community, sacrifice, and friendship with a sci-fi twist.

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The Disaster Artist is essential viewing for fans of The Room, and a fun time for those that aren’t. It is an improbable success story that looks at one man’s dream, warts and all, and shows what blind ambition, bottomless pockets, and fearlessness can achieve.

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Östlund has reached down deep to try and tell a story that hits on a number of different themes connected to community responsibility, social awareness, and the importance of understanding. The Square is an interesting thing to behold, if only mildly entertaining and occasionally tedious.

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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is a story about a community working through impossible issues not by overcoming anger, but by embracing it and allowing for it to influence the process of healing. This starts with anger, frustration, and despair, leads to conflict, and if fully explored, can bring about understanding.

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A delightful yarn about one of the most famous writers in western history, The Man Who Invented Christmas charms without overstaying its welcome, just like any respectable holiday guest.

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My Friend Dahmer is a slow burning examination of pure evil in its larval state.

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An ultraviolent yarn about a rage-inducing plague confined to a corporate office tower, ‘Mayhem’ is like Office Space crossed with Bruce Lee’s The Game of Death (the one with Kareem).

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Opening today, Blade of the Immortal is a fun, raucous, bloody love letter to samurai cinema, as well as an introspective examination of that genre’s most popular tropes. Come for the stabbings, stay for the ponderous postmodern critiques: it’s all delicious.

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Opening today at the Alamo Drafthouse, Tragedy Girls is a frothy yet black comedy that earns its R rating via several brutal murders and some barbed dialogue.

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A touching tribute to one of the most famous artists in western civilization, Loving Vincent does right by Vincent van Gogh, recounting the Dutch painter’s life story in an inventive and mesmerizing way.

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