woody harrelson

Out of the Furnace is one of those movies that spends so much time building mood and character that by the time the plot really kicks in, you realize it was in the service of nothing terribly special.

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Catching Fire may be a slight improvement but it suffers from the same weaknesses of The Hunger Game offering plodding action sequel light on action.

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This week, Alan Rapp subs for Trey to talk about After Earth with Trevan and Now You See Me with Eric.

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There are two ways that an exercise like Now You See Me could have failed miserably, and it admirably succeeds on both counts.

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In the new film Now You See Me, Interpol detective Alma Dray (Mélanie Laurent) tells her partner that sometimes logic won’t solve the puzzle. Sometimes it takes a leap of faith.

If you can head this advice, then you might really enjoy Now You See Me.

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When Quentin Tarantino writes or directs a film, one can rest assured in the knowledge that it will involve hard-hearted characters living in a dangerous world most likely fueled by drugs, hard-core violence, crime syndicates, and good music.

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Seven Psychopaths is one of those comedies where a bunch of low-life criminals go around cracking wise and shooting people. Or at least it seems to be some sort of “Tarantino-lite” movie, for a little while.

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This week’s podcast is dedicated entirely to Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, starring Jennifer Lawrence and directed by Gary Ross. Today, Eric and Trevan review the film before moving on to discuss movies with similar themes and plot lines, including Battle Royale, which just happens to be playing at the Screenland Crossroads this weekend. We know [...]

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The young-adult book series by Suzanne Collins that has taken the country by storm gets its first movie adaptation as ‘The Hunger Games’ hits theaters.

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Criterion’s ’12 Angry Men’ Blu-ray and the new ‘romantic comedy’ ‘Friends With Benefits’ are studies in the polar opposites in things you can do with a movie. Here’s the Blu-ray review:

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