the master

Last year was a great one for movies with big themes and stunning cinematography. No two movies from 2012 encapsulate both of these traits better than Life of Pi and The Master, and both are now out to own on Blu-ray.


Eric, Trey and Trevan get together to talk about the 2013 Oscar Party at the Screenland Amour this Sunday and offer up their picks for all the major categories.


Eric, Trey and Trevan talk about two new releases (Mama and Broken City), discuss disappointments and pleasant surprises of The Golden Globes and The Critics Choice Awards before speculating on The Oscars, and finally recap some of their favorite moments from 2012 in film. Subscribe to The Scene-Stealers Podcast on iTunes or our RSS. Also, check it out! Here’s [...]


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Trevan’s Top 10 of 2012

by Trevan McGee on January 15, 2013

in Top 10s

Alright, I drew the short straw, which means that after today’s 10 list we can put 2012 away for good. Until the Oscars. It was an exceptional year for film, as we saw new offerings from Paul Thomas Anderson, Wes Anderson, Quentin Tarantino, Peter Jackson, Rian Johnson and so many more. Ben Affleck proved himself. [...]


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Trey’s Top 10 of 2012

by Trey Hock on January 8, 2013

in Top 10s

Though Trey may have been more excited about a couple of films from 2011, he thought 2012 was a far more consistent year when it came to great filmmaking. So get ready for an overstuffed Top 10 Films of 2012.


The second oldest film critics group in the country tonight named The Master the best film of 2012 during its 46th annual awards meeting. The Master led all films with three wins, including Best Supporting Actor for Philip Seymour Hoffman and Best Original Screenplay for it’s director Paul Thomas Anderson.


‘The Master,’ confirms an assertion Trey made when he left the theater after viewing ‘There Will Be Blood,’ that the 2007 masterpiece was a turning point for P.T. Anderson.


It’s quiet, muted at times, as Anderson says with a single shot what lesser directors spend entire scenes on creating, and it ends on a vague whimper.


The video review is one thing, but what I wrote after that is way more detailed…leave your comments below after you see this bold, challenging film!