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A tender coming of age tale stocked with a few poignant surprises, the Italian comedy, Feather (Italian: ‘Piuma’), will inevitably draw comparisons to like-minded pictures such as Juno or Knocked Up.

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This feels like the movie Sam Elliott has been waiting his whole life to make, which, if true, worked out well for the guy. He’s never been better.

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The dark-comedy Going to Brazil follows the misadventures of a group of female friends during pre-wedding celebrations. It side-steps softer, more light-hearted comparisons like The Hangover or Bachelor Party, and improving on darker one-dimensional examples like Very Bad Things or Stag.

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Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey is the story of the eponymous climbing legend, Beckey, who has been making history and inspiring climbers since the late 1930s.

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What happens when sports fail to bridge a cultural gap? That’s the question director Maya Zinshtein asks with her insightful and crushing documentary, Forever Pure, a powerful look at the intersection of 21st century race, politics, class, mob rule, and sports.

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A postmodern meditation on mental health and manic-pixie-dream-girl tropes, Entanglement has a lot of great ideas and slick moves, even if it does sometimes feel like 6 ounces of steak sitting alone on a 12-inch plate.

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This documentary explores the intersection of business and pleasure in Hollywood during its critical and financial heyday, with Alan Carr, the ultimate outsider, right in the middle of things.

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The sold-out event saw Mr. Mortensen receive his SIFF career achievement award as well, and amounted to a brilliant send-off to a festival that clearly saved the best for last.

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‘Bang! The Bert Berns Story’ is a documentary about the eccentric, troubled, brilliant songwriter/music producer, and despite the fact that it is the work of an obvious ally (Berns’ son, Brett Berns, directed the effort), it is unflinching in its portrayal of Berns as simultaneously brilliant and flawed.

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At a time when Russia is once again rattling its international sabre, and clamping down on civil liberties, a documentary exploring one Soviet writer’s persecution at the hands of Stalin and the U.S.S.R.’s secret police feels all-too timely.

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Currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, Vanity is by far the best film playing there right now, and shouldn’t be missed by anyone who has 75 minutes to spare on a truly remarkable cinematic experience.

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Full Court is playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, and isn’t a bad watch by any means. Spencer Haywood’s story is an interesting one, and his documentary is forthright as it concerns the good as well as the bad in the man’s life. Yet the picture doesn’t exactly reinvent the wheel when it comes to its presentation.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, Paralytic is so soul-crushingly bad that it actually makes other movies seem better by comparison, so if nothing else, it might be worth a watch just as a palate cleanser.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, The Final Master is almost worth checking out for the visual feast that it is, and as a credit to the fine acting involved. It’s just too bad that the rest of the pieces couldn’t stick their respective landings.

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Molly Shannon is interviewed by Warren before Q&A and screening of ‘Other People’ at the Seattle International Film Festival!

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