julianne moore

Moore is the reason it works. She’s so natural and free of vanity. She doesn’t telegraph the tragedy of her situation like so many made-for-TV movies do. It’s a quiet performance and the uncertainty of how present Alice is undercuts everything, even the joyful moments.

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It’s no news to fans of the young-adult book series by Suzanne Collins that this third movie only covers a portion of her third novel, which is par for the course, I suppose, for a film that contains a both a colon and a hyphen in its title. But even in the Star Wars series, which now retroactively features the word “Episode” in each title, the films themselves had a form of resolution. Sometimes there were cliffhangers, sure, but the emotional journey and theme of each film were wrapped up by film’s end.

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We’re back, live via Skype recording. This week, Eric, Trevan and Trey look at The Fifth Estate, the Wikileaks story courtesy of director Bill Condon. Then, they move on to discuss Carrie, the horror remake courtesy of the director of Boys Don’t Cry and Stop-Loss.We’ve also got a new poll: What is the best horror remake since the year 2000?

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Like most modern remakes, few of the character motivations remain ambiguous. It isn’t a deal-killer, but the script fills in too many of the blanks of the original with clearly drawn lines that lessen the film’s visceral impact.

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What Maisie Knew is a perceptive adaptation of Henry James’ 1897 novel about a child stuck in the middle of a custody battle between divorced parents in London. If you want to see a film where secret service agents, military, and the highest ranking officials in the U.S. government are mowed down in bloody gunfire and subjected to humiliation, Olympus Has Fallen is for you.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, and in full release today, What Maisie Knew should be commended for breaking the traditional mold of children in movies. Indeed, while it isn’t always pretty, the film at least has the courage to commit to its message: the emotional and spiritual protection of children.

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“Crazy, Stupid, Love” may have one of the lamer and lazier titles given a film this year, but that is exactly the point. This film embraces many of the clichés of sexually driven romantic comedies, but in doing so comments on and critiques them. Just take a scene that occurs in the middle of the [...]

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I was fortunate enough to be in New York City this past weekend, one of the few cities  showing “The Kids Are All Right” before its wider release later this month. I’ve been anticipating this film since I saw the trailer a few months ago during “Greenberg”. I jabbed whoever was sitting next to me and [...]

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Movie Review: Chloe

by Alan Rapp on March 25, 2010

in Print Reviews

What makes a good erotic thriller? The simplest method I’ve found is what I call “the giggle test.” If either or both the dramatic and sexually-charged scenes of a movie make you giggle (or groan), it fails the test. An erotic thriller that makes you guffaw uncontrollably may become a cult classic (see Showgirls), but [...]

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A rare blend of serious science fiction and pulse-pounding action, director Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men is the best film of the year. Despite a gloomy apocalyptic setting (that serves as a cautionary warning for us all today), it remains a movie about hope against all odds. The kicker is that this catastrophic future is [...]

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