jason segel

After a week off, Trevan, Eric and Trey are back with three movies for your listening pleasure.

{ 0 comments }

Because This is the End has transplanted the egotistical and childish behavior normally reserved for Team Apatow’s lovable manchild characters onto the actors themselves, it feels dangerous.

{ 0 comments }

As someone who felt sentenced to high school, the series reminds me of why I hated it and how my decision making wasn’t that great back then. I won’t say that you’ll see yourself in Freaks and Geeks because everyone’s high school experience is different. Instead, I’ll say the world in the series is consistently dynamic and believable as 1980 Detroit.

{ 0 comments }

The boys return with the next-to-last podcast before the holiday break. This week, Trey discusses the Kansas City Film Critics Circle’s annual awards voting, Eric and Trevan jump into Jack Reacher, the latest from Tom Cruise and writer/director Christopher McQuarrie, and everyone dives into Judd Apatow’s This is 40 before moving on to Tom Hooper’s take on Les Miserables. [...]

{ 0 comments }

Eric tackles The Five-Year Engagement, the latest from Jason Segel and Nicholas Stoller. Meanwhile, Trey watches The Pirates! Band of Misfits and [spoiler alert] doesn’t hate it! Trevan asks questions and makes snap judgments. Subscribe to The Scene-Stealers Podcast on iTunes or our RSS.

{ 0 comments }

Thanks to a sincere script and a layered performance from Jason Segel, ‘The Five-Year Engagement’ believes wholeheartedly in actual romance — which I think is a concept that romantic comedies often “say” they support, but rarely have the chops to back it up.

{ 0 comments }

It’s a light-weight week for new releases as Trey and Eric tackle Jason Segel and Ed Helms in Jeff Who Lives At Home and Trevan and Trey talk about Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill‘s surprisingly awesome 21 Jump Street reboot. This week’s podcast is spoiler-free unless you count some botched retelling of jokes from both movies and [...]

{ 0 comments }

The overt and handsy camera work and lack of any satisfying emotional appeal in ‘Jeff, Who Lives at Home’ undermine the strength that it could have had.

{ 0 comments }

‘Jeff, Who Lives at Home’ is a low-key comedy filled with excellent, naturalistic performances.

{ 1 comment }

It’s hard to argue with the enormous amount of enthusiastic earnestness on display in The Muppets, the new reboot of a movie franchise that hasn’t been vital since 1984.

{ 0 comments }

Cameron Diaz in ‘Bad Teacher’ and ‘Page One: Inside the New York Times’ are out on Blu-ray. One asks hard questions and the other will leave you with questions.

{ 1 comment }

With last month’s Bridesmaids becoming that rare surprise success with audiences, critics, and box office alike, many have insisted that the female raunchy comedy is about to get a moment in the sun. Perfectly timed, we have Bad Teacher arriving in theaters today, practically begging to be treated as a litmus test – was Bridesmaids [...]

{ 0 comments }

Eric Melin guest host Whitney Mathews review the new bromance comedy “I Love You, Man,” starring Paul Rudd, Jason Segel, Jon Favreau, Jamie Pressly, Rashida Jones, J.K. Simmons, and Andy Samberg. “I Love You, Man” gives Paul Rudd a chance to flex his leading man chops, but does it give him a good character or [...]

{ 4 comments }