documentary

Ben Stiller’s ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ and Mark Mori’s documentary ‘Bettie Page Reveals All’ make their way to Blu-ray and DVD.

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Starting this Friday the Tivoli is playing the documentary Finding Vivian Maier, which is a telling of director John Maloof’s discovery of an artist. Vivian Maier has quickly grown into an overnight Internet sensation within the public, but especially within the art community.  Her images have been circulating through newspapers, Internet news feeds, and online image [...]

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The concept of Punk In Africa (out now from MVD Visual) is amazing – underground bands, in the time of apartheid, integrating racially and playing music that speaks truth.

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Unfortunately the weather made True/False Fest end on a chilly note. With temperatures at a high of 12 degrees, freezing rain, and some snow fall you didn’t see as big of crowds as you did on Friday, but the show went on and people still came out to films. The last film I enjoyed on this weekend filled with films was Jodorowsky’s Dune, and it was an excellent end note!

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Directed by Cynthia Hill, Private Violence is one of the most heart-wrenching documentaries that I have seen at True/False Fest this year.

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Producer and director Penn and Teller make this easy-to-approach documentary a comedic journey, and explain Tim’s process in a way that everyone can understand.

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True/False Film Fest, which started Thursday night and runs through the weekend, is definitely the best place to see new documentaries that you may not be able to see anywhere else. The crowds this year are even bigger then they were last year, which may or may not be a good thing for the people that live in Columbia, MO.

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The International House of Prayer, based right here in Kansas City, has ulterior motives in Uganda besides missionary work. Oscar-winning director Roger Ross Williams new documentary ‘God Loves Uganda’ is an interesting look at the result of their efforts.

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Musician Thomas Dolby has never made a film until now. The Invisible Lighthouse is a personal documentary made almost solely by Dolby that details the closure of a lighthouse on the coast of England near his home in Suffolk.

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The new documentary Muscle Shoals, which opens this weekend at the Tivoli Cinemas in Westport (please check out their Kickstarter page to upgrade their projectors to digital and stay in business), posits that the spirit of community forged by the musicians that created this music was part of its magic, and listening to it in the movie, it’s hard to argue.

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Blackfish, the documentary from director/co-writer Gabriela Cowperthwaite contains a simple truth that it spends its 83-minute runtime explaining, evaluating and returning to over and over again – keeping majestic, powerful creatures in captivity for interactive entertainment is wrong.

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West of Memphis is a documentary that distills 19 years of a witch hunt, a grass roots movement, lost leads, confusion, countless appeals, and hope into one remarkable movie that is hellbent on setting the record straight. Co-produced by Peter Jackson, one of many WM3 supporters who lent not only his money and time but considerable investigative effort to free the wrongly convicted Echols, Jason Baldwin, and Jessie Misskelley, it is a film with enough fervor for all three Paradise Lost movies.

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Before you think that this all this fawning over Rick Springfield is too weird, consider this: We all have a nostalgic obsession to one thing or another. For an entire generation of “nerds” (who seem to have inherited the summer movie season in all its $200-million+ budget glory), Star Wars has been a defining cultural entity. So before you go off all high and mighty about the weirdos that follow the Yellow Rick Road, think about the bit of pop culture that helped define you.

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Alex Gibney’s latest documentary, We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks, examines WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange, and asks a number of difficult questions about privacy, national security, and information access in the 21st century.

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Rock and roll photography is a delicate art, and according to the documentary Her Aim Is True, nobody was doing it better than Jini Dellaccio in the mid-to-late 1960s.

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