die hard

There’s an odd, weirdly cozy relationship between Christmas and crime, at least in cinema. Hollywood’s scribes churn out “holiday” films on the regular, and since conflict drives story, nefarious doings often get stirred into the plot-stew of Yuletide yarns. Today’s list ranks the various Christmas capers that have popped up in Christmas films throughout the years, and judged them based on their creativity, ultimate success, and quality of presentation.


It just doesn’t get much better than a film that takes a few minutes to ratchet up the tension via that classic struggle over which wire to cut so as to diffuse a bomb and avert catastrophe. To be fair, it’s a somewhat tired trope that’s been done to death, yet when it is executed well, it’s a slam dunk for that extra pinch of tension screenwriters love to mine for.


John McClane returns for a tired adventure in Mother Russia.


A Good Day to Die Hard is released Friday in the theaters, which means that the wisecracking John McClane, a character that made Bruce Willis a true movie star and action icon way back in 1988, is back in his fifth feature film.


If you’re looking to rent a new action movie or a romantic comedy this weekend, you might want to watch/read this first.


Today’s Top 10 list pays homage to those films that showcased especially vigilant Christmas combatants: the characters that really put their weight behind some heavy-handed yuletide interference — to actively sabotage or otherwise machinate to disrupt the holidays, and to to annihilate another person’s joy and happiness!


Today’s Top 10 list comes from sitegoer Brian Tousey, who teaches a film course in Los Angeles, and writes a film-based blog called Maximum Tenderness. His previous list for Scene-Stealers was Top 10 Stephen King Movie Adaptations. If you’d like to contribute a Top 10 list to Scene-Stealers, just email me at eric@scene-stealers.com. Here’s Brian: [...]


“The book is always better then the movie.” Not. Always. True. Get arguing and get ready to enjoy the Top 10 Movies as Good or Better Than Books They’re Based On.