Alejandro González Iñárritu

In films like 21 Grams, Biutiful, and Babel, he revels in the misery of his characters and then contrives to make them even more miserable. Don’t get me wrong, there’s plenty of misery and pretentiousness in Birdman (which is subtitled The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) but its mostly psychosomatic—and often played for laughs, which is a new thing for Iñárritu.

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Author Katherine Rife plumbs the depths of some of the most notorious, graphic, and bloody b-movies and exploitation films of the last 60 years as she looks at the influences of one of cinema’s most provocative talents in her book If You Like Quentin Tarantino…

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Spanning five languages and three continents, Mexican-born director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Babel proves film’s unique ability to reach beyond cultural barriers. Essentially a plea for international tolerance, the movie showcases images that are among the most breathtaking of the year. Iñárritu is at his most poetic when he illustrates humanity stripped of its differences and [...]

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