2016

[Rating: Minor Rock Fist Up] Millennials need a version of Lassie that isn’t wholesome. Instead, a story of a dog exploring the perverted, introverted world it lives in. Ok, maybe this isn’t needed, but it’s certainly available now Wiener-Dog. Remember Paulie, that movie from 1998 where a parrot gets passed around from owner to owner? [...]

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After botching an ill-conceived bank robbery in a desolate California town, two wannabe crooks flee the scene with a hostage into the desert, where they inexplicably stumble upon Carnage Park, a remote stretch of wilderness occupied by a psychotic ex-military sniper.

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Free State of Jones is not a 100% historically accurate snapshot in time—it has epic span and portrays Knight’s myth through the lens of today’s social climate.

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Currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, Vanity is by far the best film playing there right now, and shouldn’t be missed by anyone who has 75 minutes to spare on a truly remarkable cinematic experience.

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The Lobster has been surviving the big blockbuster summer on positive word of mouth alone. If you miss it in theaters, don’t fear: It’s the perfect movie to watch at home, where you can marvel at its absurdity and ponder its questions with someone you love.

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Full Court is playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, and isn’t a bad watch by any means. Spencer Haywood’s story is an interesting one, and his documentary is forthright as it concerns the good as well as the bad in the man’s life. Yet the picture doesn’t exactly reinvent the wheel when it comes to its presentation.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, Paralytic is so soul-crushingly bad that it actually makes other movies seem better by comparison, so if nothing else, it might be worth a watch just as a palate cleanser.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, The Final Master is almost worth checking out for the visual feast that it is, and as a credit to the fine acting involved. It’s just too bad that the rest of the pieces couldn’t stick their respective landings.

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Molly Shannon is interviewed by Warren before Q&A and screening of ‘Other People’ at the Seattle International Film Festival!

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Although Finding Kim does a great job filling in the blank spaces of its primary subject’s life with friend interviews, along with other transitioned folks, the answer to this question remains elusive.

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‘The Weekend Sailor’ isn’t a hard-hitting investigation or a thought-provoking exploration of anything beyond what can happen when you believe in yourself and your dreams. Although this might leave some people wanting, for those looking for an entertaining, feel-good story with a cast of colorful characters, this documentary fits the bill.

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There are a few scenes that are over-the-top and dramatic for the sake of being dramatic, but ultimately, the film delivers with its message that labels are only as important as we want them to be. In the end, we all die and the impact we have on someone’s life will change through their grieving process. See this film then ask yourself what your legacy will be with family and friends.

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Son of Saul is a one-of-a kind immersive experience that gives stark glimpses of death-camp murder and madness with a frightening frankness.

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‘Brief Encounter’ is David Lean’s exquisite romantic drama that seems simple on the surface, but even in the face of the extra-marital affair at is heart, it has a heightened sense of morality.

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Richard Linklater’s latest puts an idea that Hollywood has never been able to crack on full display: that masculinity doesn’t have to be toxic and bros can show you a good time.

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