Print Reviews

Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel team up for Sex Tape, an R-rated comedy that tries to balance raunchy humor with the wholesomeness of a family film and ends up failing both genres. The trailer gives over-explains the entire premise, but here it is again: Diaz and Segel play Annie and Jason, a loving couple that started hot [...]

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Nine years in the future, DeMonaco thinks this is still an issue that people will be dealing with, and has fun with the idea of the poor finally fighting back.

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The maniacal genius Paul Haggis has created the impossible. Third Person is a film that is complex and trite, clichéd and nonsensical, and misanthropic and overly sentimental.

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Caesar returns in the summer sci-fi epic that is more about the cost of being a leader than it is the novelty of talking monkeys.

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The really great action movies are all about urgency—that life-and-death situation where the stakes couldn’t be any higher and the main character doesn’t have any other choice but to forge ahead.

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In Game of Thrones, she plays miniature badass Arya Stark, who fears no man and has a comeback for every insult thrown her way. But in Heatstroke, Williams gets to show her versatility as a young actress and convincingly plays troubled youth Jo,

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This is a public service announcement. This is not a test. Do not go and see Earth to Echo.

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In her new film, Obvious Child, Gillian Robespierre shows her audience the realities of life through which great comedy is born.

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Lucky Them is a laudable film. If you enjoy stories of the burnt out fan, and insightful critic, then director Megan Griffiths‘ new film is worth your time.

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Ti West’s found-footage horror flick ‘The Sacrament’ is not always great, but it’s much better than most of its genre counterparts.

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The notion that we are all putting on a show during the first phase of a relationship, and that this false presentation must inevitably end, is at the crux of ‘The One I Love,’ a movie that explores the necessities of living honestly in a partnership with another human being.

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“Follow the yellow brick road.” An exhausted pregnant woman sits in a dank hallway, telling the tale of the Wizard of Oz to her unborn child in a weak attempt to make a metaphor about a happy group of friends that help one of their group go home. And then some dude runs by, and [...]

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, Half of a Yellow Sun is a hard, emotional, bloody, yet ultimately worthwhile look at an African independence movement through the eyes of people who, fifty years later, still seem entirely familiar.

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The central premise of Mirage Men, a documentary currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, is that all of this alien abduction hoopla, all this U.F.O. and conspiracy theory enthusiasm, is the intended byproduct of a deliberate government-sanctioned disinformation campaign.

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Seth MacFarlane returns to the director’s chair with A Million Ways To Die In The West, a shaggy dog comedy that places MacFarlane front and center, not as a computer-generated Teddy bear, but as Albert Stark, a sheep herder who hates the time period and frontier with a passion. Of course, “shaggy dog” is just another [...]

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