Blu-ray/DVD Reviews

Vinegar Syndrome’s DVD/Blu-ray combo release of Don’t Go in the Woods … Alone! is an excellent-looking version of a very cheap movie that appeals to a very specific subset of people that I now must consider myself part of.

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Two new DVD releases from Music Box Films explore unusual communities. Happy Valley shows the collective denial of a community shaken by accusations of abuse against one of its most prominent members, while Antarctica: A Year on Ice romanticizes a group that chooses to live far from civilization.

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Despite being billed as being from “master of Filipino sleaze, Cirio Santiago,” the exploitation flick “The Muthers” is surprisingly good-natured.

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With this new Criterion Blu-ray (and DVD) reissue, Ride the Pink Horse should take its place among the film noir genre as one of the greats.

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If you’re looking to get beyond Sergio Leone’s Man with No Name films and want to explore the world of Italian Western cinema, this is an excellent start. As part of Arrow’s first batch of releases here in the United States, they’ve managed to hit it right out of the park.

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Whether Fellini Satyricon is a paean to excess or a reflective deconstruction of ancient myths and legends, one thing is for sure: It isn’t driven by a strong narrative or what one would consider effective acting, in any sense. Instead, its a series of stagey set pieces that happen to feature one of a couple main characters, loosely strung together by theme.

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Casual jazz fans and jazz historians alike have much to cheer about this week as the 1942 film Syncopation hits Blu-ray, courtesy the Cohen Media Group.

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In The Guest, out now on Blu-ray, Barrett and Wingard aim their sights towards a more straightforward thriller, adding in just enough shocking violence to border on being a horror movie.

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Two legendary rock n’ roll figures get the biopic treatment with wildly different results, new on Blu-ray this week.

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When I was a kid, I loved — and still love — Terry Gilliam’s Time Bandits, out now on a fantastic-looking Blu-ray from The Criterion Collection. It offered a wealth of visual delights, a main character I could relate to, a sardonic sense of humor, and it never pandered.

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[Rating: Minor Rock Fist Up] Ever shopped at WalMart, cheered for the Dallas Cowboys, or eaten at KFC? There’s a little bit of shame in your personal knowledge that you probably did so willingly, and would probably do so again. That’s kind of how I felt about Drive Hard (Available now on DVD and Blu-Ray), the newest [...]

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Frank Capra is one of classic cinema’s most famous directors. His movies from the 1930s and 40s epitomized American ideals and attitudes like few other. Two of his best pre-World War II movies are newly available on Blu-ray.

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L’avventura is the film that gave Antonioni a name. The film was booed at its first screening at the Cannes Film Festival, but at the second viewing of the film, it was greeted quite enthusiastically, and then finally awarded a Special Jury Prize for “the beauty of its images, and for seeking to create a new film language.”

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[Rock Fist Way Down] It’s hard to say a lot about a kids’ movie as straightforward as Under Wraps (Available now on DVD), so I’m not even going to sugarcoat it for you today. Danny is always getting into trouble and breaking things, despite his good intentions, so when his parents tell him not to [...]

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The Two Faces of January brings three solid performances together to help a decent script turn into an hour and a half of quite entertaining film.

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