Blu-ray/DVD Reviews

A lonesome stranger with nerves of steel must track down and kill a rogue hitman to satisfy an outstanding debt.

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Following the economic collapse of a town in rural Nevada, Fern (Frances McDormand) packs her van and explores an unconventional life in the vast landscape of the American West.

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Written and directed by Ryan Spindell, the new horror anthology The Mortuary Collection stars Clancy Brown and Caitlin Custer in a collection of four tales of ever-expanding terror, surrounded by a frame story which weaves in and out of the installments themselves.

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Sophie Deraspe’s modern retelling of the tragedy of Antigone is full of heavy hitting drama. Insightful and full of critiques, Deraspe cleverly brings the ancient story to life through a contemporary lens.

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The latest film from Adam Egypt Mortimer, ‘Archenemy’ (out February 16 on DVD and Blu-ray from RLJE Films), sees the writer/director once again applying his independent lens to a new genre.

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There’s a lot to take from Steve Byrne’s ‘The Opening Act,’ but the main takeaway is if you’re willing to take a chance, enjoy it while it lasts, rather than worrying about what happens if it doesn’t go exactly as planned.

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Mondo Macabro’s latest double-feature Blu-ray features two films from French director Jean Louis Van Belle – 1971’s The Lady Kills and 1972’s Pervertissima.

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Director John Strysik’s 1995 feature ‘The Spirit Gallery’ is a hallucinatory shot-on-video oddity which manages to take a familiar plot and turn it into something special.

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Watching ‘Woman Chasing the Butterfly of Death’ unfold on Blu-ray is as close as I’ve gotten to true insanity in a long while, but it’s not like the director just threw things at the screen to see what would stick.

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What’s appealing about ‘Bliss’ is the ride on which Begos takes the viewer, strapping them into the same hellbent train as the protagonist, parceling out the inevitable reveal in a string of hallucinatory visuals.

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‘MOMO: The Missouri Monster’ is a fairly fun, low-budget, pseudo-documentary grindhouse homage.

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Sheets’ gorefest doesn’t wink to its audience, which is a major plus for ‘Clownado.’ While its audience might be small, those who want to see the film won’t be disappointed. Other more casual fans might find it wanting.

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‘Don’t Look,’ billed as a “unique, female-directed twist on horror films,” doesn’t break any new ground in the world of slasher horror, but for a first feature, it’s really solid.

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There’s long been a case for the idea that great art can be found in the margins, and ‘Detour’ is a perfect example of this.

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If you’ve never seen ‘The Passion of Joan of Arc,’ you’re probably wondering what all the fuss is about. Simply put, this 1928 landmark still has the power to stun today. The Criterion Blu-ray is a must-have.

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