Blu-ray/DVD Reviews

[Rating: Minor Rock Fist Up] Ever shopped at WalMart, cheered for the Dallas Cowboys, or eaten at KFC? There’s a little bit of shame in your personal knowledge that you probably did so willingly, and would probably do so again. That’s kind of how I felt about Drive Hard (Available now on DVD and Blu-Ray), the newest [...]

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Frank Capra is one of classic cinema’s most famous directors. His movies from the 1930s and 40s epitomized American ideals and attitudes like few other. Two of his best pre-World War II movies are newly available on Blu-ray.

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L’avventura is the film that gave Antonioni a name. The film was booed at its first screening at the Cannes Film Festival, but at the second viewing of the film, it was greeted quite enthusiastically, and then finally awarded a Special Jury Prize for “the beauty of its images, and for seeking to create a new film language.”

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[Rock Fist Way Down] It’s hard to say a lot about a kids’ movie as straightforward as Under Wraps (Available now on DVD), so I’m not even going to sugarcoat it for you today. Danny is always getting into trouble and breaking things, despite his good intentions, so when his parents tell him not to [...]

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The Two Faces of January brings three solid performances together to help a decent script turn into an hour and a half of quite entertaining film.

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What is remarkable about The Vanishing is how, like Gone Girl, it reveals much about its central mystery fairly early on in the film. Unlike Gone Girl, it continues to deepen its characters and maintain a believable sense of dread that plays into its central conceit.

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Out now in a new restored 4K digital restoration on Blu-ray from The Criterion Collection, this emotionally raw picture combines minimalistic acting, evocative framing, and unabashed melodrama for a timeless moviegoing experience.

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Two darkly comic indie films make their way to Blu-ray from IFC and Drafthouse Films, one steeped in bizarre magical realism and the other a downward spiral in a blue-collar neighborhood.

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Jackpot‘s visually a lot of fun to watch. You know just by looking at the cover of it that it’s got to be a dark comedy of some form, and it delivers on that note spectacularly.

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What do you get when you combine the convoluted plot of a movie you’ve probably already seen with one of the most hilariously enigmatic actors of our time? If you guessed Rage out August 12th on DVD and Blu-Ray starring Hollywood-oddity Nicolas Cage, you probably guessed right.

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Roger Michell’s charming film Le Week-End, out on DVD now, explores the relationship between Meg (Lindsay Duncan) and Nick (Jim Broadbent), who are on their 30th wedding anniversary in Paris, where they also spent their honeymoon.

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Frank Pavich’s documentary on the “best movie never made” does a fantastic job of illuminating what Jodorowsky’s vision might have looked like had it ever made it to the big screen.

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In the same way that the judge in Devil’s Knot dismisses the inconsistent testimony of one young man accused of murder, it’s easy to dismiss the movie for its huge number of inconsistencies and jumps in logic that disallow the viewer to get wrapped up in what is truly a compelling and gruesome narrative.

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It would be wrong to describe Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1962 film L’eclisse, out now in a dual-format Blu-ray-DVD combo pack from The Criterion Collection, as impenetrable.

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Generation War provides a German perspective on the events of World War II through the eyes of five young people who experience the war in profoundly different ways.

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