Blu-ray/DVD Reviews

Both Haneke and Huppert were clear on their intentions from the start, and this alignment produced a movie that holds up as one of the best arthouse films of the last 20 years, with a nearly unmatched quiet kind of intensity.

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These features and this restoration of Michael Curtiz’s The Breaking Point make a great case for this overlooked film joining the discussion of classic-era Hollywood all-timers.

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Stalker, released originally in 1979, is a challenging piece of cinema. It’s a lengthy, talky quest for meaning, punctuated by long takes and huge moments of silence.

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[Rating: Solid Rock Fist Up] Culture is always evolving. As the times change, so do attitudes. Sure, you can read all about the post-60s sexual revolution hangover, but what better way to experience this pivotal moment in time (or any, for that matter) than through something that was made in that moment? Something that gives [...]

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Nicholas Ray would go on to make In a Lonely Place, Johnny Guitar, and most famously, A Rebel Without A Cause. The new Criterion Blu-ray of They Live by Night proves that his filmmaking was assured and iconoclastic right from the beginning.

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‘XX,’ new on Blu-ray, is a horror anthology that offers unfulfilling tales and no true scares.

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We already knew Ozu’s 1932 silent comedy ‘I Was Born, But…’ was a classic, but a new Criterion Blu-ray of that and his 1959 re-imagining ‘Good Morning’ may restore its reputation as well.

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Just like Fats Domino’s “Let’s Twist Again,” Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 can’t play the same familiar chords with lesser lyrics and expect the same results. It isn’t quite the revved-up rallying call for outcasts that the first one was, so this sequel is best approached with lower expectations.

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Made directly following Francis Ford Coppola’s The Outsiders, Rumble Fish has similar young adult coming-of-age source material, but Coppola’s approach to the material is very, very different. It’s out on Blu-ray from Criterion now.

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This Criterion Blu-ray from the new 2K restoration, and with all of it’s supplemental features, is the definitive version of the film. For anyone looking to add a single Hepburn/Tracy movie to their collection, this is the one.

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‘Toni Erdmann’ is funny, unpredictable, and delectable throughout its entirety. It is with no small amount of anger, however, that I must report that  Blu-ray edition is being released only as “Manufactured on Demand.”

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Jackie isn’t standard biopic fare, but instead a hugely resonant examination of conflicting emotions, grief in the spotlight, and the blurry lines between real people and myth-making.

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Beyond the Valley of the Dolls is Roger Ebert’s sole screenplay credit and it’s gonzo as hell. He takes a bunch of stock characters (and c-list actors and former Playboy playmates) and grinds them through enough ridiculous conflict to put a season of American Horror Story to shame.

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Son of Saul is a one-of-a kind immersive experience that gives stark glimpses of death-camp murder and madness with a frightening frankness.

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‘Brief Encounter’ is David Lean’s exquisite romantic drama that seems simple on the surface, but even in the face of the extra-marital affair at is heart, it has a heightened sense of morality.

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