Reviews

J.C. Chandor’s latest feature film, A Most Violent Year, is being hailed by some as The Godfather for our time. This comparison may ring true, but A Most Violent Year lacks the emotional impact of Coppola’s masterpiece.

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In The Guest, out now on Blu-ray, Barrett and Wingard aim their sights towards a more straightforward thriller, adding in just enough shocking violence to border on being a horror movie.

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American Sniper is a tense, heart-wrenching, vivid account of war and the stranglehold it places upon the human mind. However, it was cautiously made, presumably not to upset the surviving family and friends.

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Wow. What happened to Michael Mann?

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Two legendary rock n’ roll figures get the biopic treatment with wildly different results, new on Blu-ray this week.

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This electrifying film puts the tension, the fear, the courage, and the tragedy in perspective, and dramatizes it through the struggles of people, not rhetoric.

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Larry “Doc” Sportello is surprised when his former girlfriend shows up on his doorstep and explains and a plot involving her billionaire boyfriend, his wife, and her boyfriend. The plan for kidnapping gets shaken up by the oddball characters entangled in this groovy kidnapping romp based upon the novel by Thomas Pynchon.

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The movie wants to be about courage and resilience, but it’s painted in so many broad strokes and tired clichés that it doesn’t quite register on that level.

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The Imitation Game is an enjoyable and well-done biopic that lacks a certain intangible hook which holds it back in my mind from a Best Picture nomination, despite some of the nods it has already gotten.

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With his new film Big Eyes, Tim Burton and collaborators suffer from what I like to call bad history teacher syndrome. They are too interested in the what and not enough in the how or the why.

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A witch tasks a childless baker and his wife with procuring magical items from classic fairy tales to reverse the curse put on their family tree.

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A kitschy 1981 3D movie is restored and re-released in theaters for a slow rollout across the country.

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“Wild” breaks the mold of other trip-as-self-discovery films with a refreshing honesty.

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When I was a kid, I loved — and still love — Terry Gilliam’s Time Bandits, out now on a fantastic-looking Blu-ray from The Criterion Collection. It offered a wealth of visual delights, a main character I could relate to, a sardonic sense of humor, and it never pandered.

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The third and final entry in The Hobbit trilogy is by far the strongest of the three. It gives a faithful and lovingly-crafted foray into Middle Earth for fans of the book and new fans alike, while being able to incorporate lore from other writings of Tolkien into the mix and tying all six films together as a unit, binding them with common story elements and ties to each other.

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