Reviews

Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel team up for Sex Tape, an R-rated comedy that tries to balance raunchy humor with the wholesomeness of a family film and ends up failing both genres. The trailer gives over-explains the entire premise, but here it is again: Diaz and Segel play Annie and Jason, a loving couple that started hot [...]

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Besides being an invaluable primer on the life of a man who was omnipresent in any discussion about movies for over 40 years, Life Itself has a surprising amount of raw emotion.

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Nine years in the future, DeMonaco thinks this is still an issue that people will be dealing with, and has fun with the idea of the poor finally fighting back.

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Frank Pavich’s documentary on the “best movie never made” does a fantastic job of illuminating what Jodorowsky’s vision might have looked like had it ever made it to the big screen.

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The maniacal genius Paul Haggis has created the impossible. Third Person is a film that is complex and trite, clichéd and nonsensical, and misanthropic and overly sentimental.

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Caesar returns in the summer sci-fi epic that is more about the cost of being a leader than it is the novelty of talking monkeys.

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The really great action movies are all about urgency—that life-and-death situation where the stakes couldn’t be any higher and the main character doesn’t have any other choice but to forge ahead.

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In Game of Thrones, she plays miniature badass Arya Stark, who fears no man and has a comeback for every insult thrown her way. But in Heatstroke, Williams gets to show her versatility as a young actress and convincingly plays troubled youth Jo,

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This is a public service announcement. This is not a test. Do not go and see Earth to Echo.

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In her new film, Obvious Child, Gillian Robespierre shows her audience the realities of life through which great comedy is born.

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Transformers: Age of Extinction isn’t so much a movie as it is a 165-minute propaganda film made to appeal to the widest demographic possible — but mainly for China.

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In the same way that the judge in Devil’s Knot dismisses the inconsistent testimony of one young man accused of murder, it’s easy to dismiss the movie for its huge number of inconsistencies and jumps in logic that disallow the viewer to get wrapped up in what is truly a compelling and gruesome narrative.

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Lucky Them is a laudable film. If you enjoy stories of the burnt out fan, and insightful critic, then director Megan Griffiths‘ new film is worth your time.

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It may be set in some kind of vague dystopian near-future, but The Rover isn’t a sci-fi story at all. The dusty Australian backdrop, the heightened mood of constant danger, and Guy Pearce’s mysterious loner character give the deceptively simple film away as a spaghetti western.

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It would be wrong to describe Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1962 film L’eclisse, out now in a dual-format Blu-ray-DVD combo pack from The Criterion Collection, as impenetrable.

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