Reviews

Fabienne is a star of French cinema. She reigns amongst men who love and admire her. When she publishes her memoirs, her daughter Lumir returns from New York to Paris with her husband and young child. The reunion between mother and daughter will quickly turn to confrontation: truths will be told, accounts settled, loves and resentments confessed.

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‘Black Magic for White Boys’ is a dark comedy full of bizarre characters and relevant themes. When a failing magician turns to the dark arts to regain popularity, trouble ensues when selfish characters attempt to use the spells for their own greedy interest.

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‘We Are Little Zombies,’ the debut from writer/director Makoto Nagahisa, is simultaneously nihilistic, adorable, and emotionally touching.

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Using interviews and rare archival footage, JOHN LEWIS: GOOD TROUBLE chronicles Lewis’ 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration.

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Given that the cast is essentially Nevin, Mortimer, and Heathcote for the majority of ‘Relic’, it hinges almost entirely on the performances of the three actors and the mood created by a dark country house gone ever-so-slightly to seed.

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This rock doc fails to look more closely at 70s rocker Suzi Quatro’s influence on the current crop of musicians out there – but it still doesn’t stop ‘Suzi Q’ from being entertaining.

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The scope of ‘Homewrecker’ might be narrow, but it results in an intense focus.

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The story of Johnny Cash’s first wife Vivian Liberto is finally told, as a forgotten moment in music history.

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‘Mr. Jones’ is a well-acted, timely, and important film that nevertheless finds itself bogged down by the larger narrative and choppy character work.

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Well shot, tightly scripted, and superbly acted by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, ‘7500’ soars.

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The sheer number of creative ways in which writer/director Jeffrey McHale uses footage for this retrospective movie documentary makes it the new gold standard of the genre, taking a movie you’re likely already biased against and leaving you feeling like you might just love it.

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A blood and gore-soaked romp through a Home Alone-esque scenario with 21st century sensibilities, ‘Becky’ is all sorts of fun.

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A jumbled, chaotic mess of imagery, character sketches, bad jazz, and even worse storytelling, ‘Adrift in Soho’ is just that: adrift.

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Two bank robbers & their hostage retreat into a motel. When their boss doesn’t show up, they must battle through their deteriorating mental state and find a way out before they turn on each other.

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While the fictional parodies of themselves have given me a few chuckles, along with plenty to see and salivate over, it is time to say goodbye—a theme that is very apparent throughout this movie.

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