Reviews

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is a story about a community working through impossible issues not by overcoming anger, but by embracing it and allowing for it to influence the process of healing. This starts with anger, frustration, and despair, leads to conflict, and if fully explored, can bring about understanding.

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A delightful yarn about one of the most famous writers in western history, The Man Who Invented Christmas charms without overstaying its welcome, just like any respectable holiday guest.

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Instead of doing a rundown of the flaws of this superhero movie Simon would rather transcribe a story, to the best of his ability, as he is sure it all happened.

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The Florida Project, Sean Baker’s new, funny, thoughtful, poignant and beautiful film is a realist fairy tale, a gorgeous 35mm technical experiment, a heartbreaking character drama and a staggering documentation of the many possible meanings of the word “bitch”.

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My Friend Dahmer is a slow burning examination of pure evil in its larval state.

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A housewife snaps one day and her mental psyche takes on the personality of a dog.

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An ultraviolent yarn about a rage-inducing plague confined to a corporate office tower, ‘Mayhem’ is like Office Space crossed with Bruce Lee’s The Game of Death (the one with Kareem).

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Opening today, Blade of the Immortal is a fun, raucous, bloody love letter to samurai cinema, as well as an introspective examination of that genre’s most popular tropes. Come for the stabbings, stay for the ponderous postmodern critiques: it’s all delicious.

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Thor: Ragnarok is a hilarious ride, that doesn’t take any itself seriously at all, thanks to director Taika Waititi, who delivers a fun, LSD-laced superhero flick.

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Jane Goodall’s 60 years working with chimpanzees is explored in this new personal documentary.

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Opening today at the Alamo Drafthouse, Tragedy Girls is a frothy yet black comedy that earns its R rating via several brutal murders and some barbed dialogue.

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A touching tribute to one of the most famous artists in western civilization, Loving Vincent does right by Vincent van Gogh, recounting the Dutch painter’s life story in an inventive and mesmerizing way.

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78/52 does more than just analyze the scene the film is known for, but helps viewers understand the importance of this scene and the importance of Hitchcock’s work as the Master of Suspense.

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Liam Neeson plays ‘Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House’ in a cold, soulless D.C. performance.

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Unfocused, indulgent, and scattered, Human Flow, opening at the Tivoli Friday, doesn’t know what it wants to be, and has an even more difficult time trying to figure out what it wants to say.

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