Reviews

George Clooney and Britt Robertson journey to Tomorrowland, an incredibly flawed and unexpected misstep from writer/director Brad Bird.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, Breathe Umphefumlo is a witty, thoughtful, and enjoyable take on a classic opera standard.

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Currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, Cub follows a troop of Belgian boy scouts on an excursion into the French countryside for a multi-night camping trip.

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Currently playing at the Seattle International Film Festival, Personal Gold is a personal experience gilded in the minds of those who participated and filmed it. For anyone else watching, it’s an infomercial wrapped in a rote exercise in pedantic feel-good documentary filmmaking. This is like going to a baseball game that has a 20-minute time-share pitch before the first at-bat, and again between every half-inning.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, fans of dark, twisted, mean-spirited Sci-Fi could do a hell of a lot worse than Circle.

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This cadre of crazies from Mad Max: Fury Road has a corollary to 70-year-old director George Miller: They are driven by a singular vision and purpose. Theirs is to find and kill the rogue warrior Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron) and bring back the harem she absconded with, and Miller’s is to present one nearly nonstop action scene with enough character and metaphorical connection to keep an audience engaged for two hours.

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After a humiliating performance at Lincoln Center, the Barden Bellas enter an international competition that no American group has ever won in order to regain their status and right to perform.

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It’s a shame that Van Damme isn’t a better actor, because his rugged, worn looks finally give him a unique dimension that he has always lacked as a performer. He, and perhaps, the film’s director, don’t seem smart enough to play off of his inelegant appearance.

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Kill Me Three Times can’t seem to make up its mind about what kind of movie it wants to be.

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The plot, if you can call it that, follows Reese Witherspoon’s Cooper, a by-the-book Texas cop who has to protect Sofía Vergara’s Riva, who’s loud and obnoxious.

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Usually when a cheap movie with a bankable cast goes largely unpromoted, it’s for a simple and obvious reason: It’s not any good.

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Thanks to a script by John Scott 3 and direction from Henry Hobson, Maggie ends up being efficient, smart and actually about something.

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The most notable thing about The D-Train, opening in theaters today, is Jack Black’s transformation into a desperate loser who cannot express the repressed feelings of love that he has for an old high school friend.

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A veteran actress comes face-to-face with an uncomfortable reflection of herself when she agrees to take part in a revival of the play that launched her career 20 years earlier.

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If these costumed super heroes are truly the gods of our time and the films that they are in each summer are our contemporary mythological canon, then these films should reflect our current understanding of each other, including visual representation of women and minorities, instead of parading out old narrative tropes and stereotypes as if they were steadfast truths.

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