Reviews

If you’re looking to get beyond Sergio Leone’s Man with No Name films and want to explore the world of Italian Western cinema, this is an excellent start. As part of Arrow’s first batch of releases here in the United States, they’ve managed to hit it right out of the park.

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Will a child enjoy this movie? Of course. It’s colorful, sweet and has plenty of moment’s that a child’s sense of humor will enjoy. The parents, on the other hand, may think to themselves they could’ve spent their time better.

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[Rating: Minor Rock Fist Down] At the midway point of Unfinished Business, I had realized where I had seen this movie before. A business owner and his team travel the country, to make sure a deal gets done. Along the way, there’s another company trying to sabotage their deal. Other hijinx ensue, including an accident with [...]

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Mr. Turner covers 25 years of the contradictory painter’s life, and it often feels like it, moving at a languorous pace over its two-and-a-half hours. Like it’s subject, however, the film has an irascible charm.

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Whether Fellini Satyricon is a paean to excess or a reflective deconstruction of ancient myths and legends, one thing is for sure: It isn’t driven by a strong narrative or what one would consider effective acting, in any sense. Instead, its a series of stagey set pieces that happen to feature one of a couple main characters, loosely strung together by theme.

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Traveling 10 years in the future, Lou, Nick and Jacob set out to investigate who tried to kill Lou.

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As a film, Sam Taylor-Johnson‘s version of Fifty Shades of Grey is a not good, not terrible adaptation of E.L. James‘ wretched book. As a cultural event, Fifty Shades is a tragic missed opportunity.

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Moore is the reason it works. She’s so natural and free of vanity. She doesn’t telegraph the tragedy of her situation like so many made-for-TV movies do. It’s a quiet performance and the uncertainty of how present Alice is undercuts everything, even the joyful moments.

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Matthew Vaughn adapts another Mark Millar story with mixed results.

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Jupiter Ascending may be an unfocused mess, but as far as big-budget sci-fi fantasies go, it’s one of the most entertaining messes ever.

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Casual jazz fans and jazz historians alike have much to cheer about this week as the 1942 film Syncopation hits Blu-ray, courtesy the Cohen Media Group.

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J.C. Chandor’s latest feature film, A Most Violent Year, is being hailed by some as The Godfather for our time. This comparison may ring true, but A Most Violent Year lacks the emotional impact of Coppola’s masterpiece.

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In The Guest, out now on Blu-ray, Barrett and Wingard aim their sights towards a more straightforward thriller, adding in just enough shocking violence to border on being a horror movie.

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American Sniper is a tense, heart-wrenching, vivid account of war and the stranglehold it places upon the human mind. However, it was cautiously made, presumably not to upset the surviving family and friends.

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Wow. What happened to Michael Mann?

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