Warren Cantrell

A somber retelling of an American tragedy projected through the #MeToo lens, Lizzie is a 100+ year-old tale that feels right at home in 2018.

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‘The Song of Sway Lake’ is a harmless trifle of a film about the weight of memory as seen through the prism of wistful longing.

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‘Mandy’ is a blood-spattered, acid-dosed fever dream of a film that takes far too long to rev up, but never lets its foot off the pedal when it does.

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Ostensibly a tale about long-distance romance, ‘Juliet, Naked’ boasts strong performances and an introspective charm.

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‘Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood’ walks the fine line between intriguing and tragic.

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A quiet, fragile movie about a family balancing on a knife’s edge, Leave No Trace finds a way to give expression and voice to the invisible bonds that tether loved ones to each other

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Gus Van Sant’s unflinching portrait of a sometimes deeply unpleasant person is almost as brave as its subject, side-stepping more obvious and tired tropes of the genre so as to uncover new truths about a few very old topics.

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Sorry to Bother You is a timely meditation on class, race, privilege, and the momentum of the masses.

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Hampered by characters that don’t make a lot of sense, a story that is a predictable, convoluted mess, and acting that wouldn’t pass muster in a traveling U.S.O. company, ‘Susu’ does just about everything wrong.

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A touching tribute to a true titan of American theatre, ‘Every Act of Life’ is a fine documentary whose only real failing is a reluctance to challenge its subject or the viewer.

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‘Return to Mount Kennedy’ simultaneously finds a way to relay an old story about American royalty while fleshing out one man’s journey to reinvent himself and reconcile the self-harvested demons of his past.

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Thematically inconsistent at times, there’s two portions of ‘Afghan Cycles’: both of them considerate, important, and very well made.

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‘Sadie’ is a film about a small community whose children are a litmus test for a bigger world moving in a dark direction.

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‘The Russian Five’ is an engaging peek behind professional hockey’s iron curtain, and is stocked full of laughs, tears, blood, and stitches.

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A half-Woke fever-dream populated by big ideas and half-finished epiphanies, ‘Bodied’ is a bad film with a lot of good ideas.

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