Trevan McGee

As a spectacle, as pure entertainment, The Force Awakens delivers. Its pace is near break-neck, but it rarely feels rushed. The climax manages to feel bigger-than-life and starkly intimate at the same time. And people will be talking about the movie’s big plot points for months.

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Room is a powerful drama that signals the arrival of Brie Larson as a dramatic actress.

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Daniel Craig returns for possibly his final outing as James Bond. That’s a good thing.

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Guillermo Del Toro tells a ghost story the only way he knows how.

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Aaron Sorkin returns to Silicon Valley this time with director Danny Boyle for Steve Jobs, a movie that is less a biopic and more a collection of three one-act plays that are less concerned with the man and more concerned with perpetuating the legend of the magnetic, charismatic, dreamer who founded Apple and revolutionized computing.

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Jesse Eisenberg stars in American Ultra, a spy movie/stoner movie hybrid that plays a lot like if Jason Bourne worked at the same convenience store as Dante and Randal.

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[Rating: Minor Rock Fist Down] Joel Edgerton wears many hats in The Gift as writer, director and actor, but none of them fit particularly well, here. The Gift plays like an early draft of a Twilight Zone episode before Rod Serling tossed it out and started over or saved it for Night Gallery. Jason Bateman plays Simon, a successful salesman who [...]

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Jurassic World is a bad impression of a Spielberg film. It rips off all of the bombast, but manages to capture none of the likability of the first one, instead resorting to basic fan service and overt nods to the original. Maybe worst of all, Jurassic World is stupid.

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Dwayne Johnson stars in San Andreas, a disaster movie that’s too competent to be schlock, too dumb to be interesting and too concerned with spectacle to be entertaining.

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George Clooney and Britt Robertson journey to Tomorrowland, an incredibly flawed and unexpected misstep from writer/director Brad Bird.

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Usually when a cheap movie with a bankable cast goes largely unpromoted, it’s for a simple and obvious reason: It’s not any good.

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Thanks to a script by John Scott 3 and direction from Henry Hobson, Maggie ends up being efficient, smart and actually about something.

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Rating: Minor Rock Fist Down Sequels are tough. Even if you’ve made a wildly successful first film. Even if you’ve had more than six movies to establish your continuity. Even if you have the deep pockets of a major studio like Disney. Even if you’ve got a director who’s incredibly good at writing ensembles. Sequels [...]

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Furious 7 is exactly what you’d expect if you’ve seen any of the later entries in the franchise, watched any of the trailers, seen the poster with the parachuting car or heard Diesel’s claim about it winning Best Picture – genre ridiculousness with a couple of good stunts.

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Matthew Vaughn adapts another Mark Millar story with mixed results.

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