Scott Pewenofkit

Southbound is a multi-director horror anthology that explores the consequences of seemingly unforgivable actions by its principal characters.

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The Keeping Room, opening today in Kansas City, is a slasher film disguised as a period drama.

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Z for Zachariah is a post-apocalyptic story of survival.

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Best of Enemies examines the televised debates between intellectuals William F. Buckley, Jr. and Gore Vidal, which coincided with the presidential primaries of 1968.

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Tangerine, now showing at the Tivoli in Kansas City, is a sleazy, comical adventure story about a spurned transsexual prostitute out for revenge after she’s released from the county jail.

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Lila & Eve is an interesting exploitation/psychodrama about a grieving mother who takes the law into her own hands after her son is killed in a drive-by shooting.

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Beloved Sisters, out now on Blu Ray and DVD through Music Box Films, is a dull slog through Enlightenment-era Europe about two aristocratic sisters who fall in love with German writer Friedrich Schiller.

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Red Army, out on Blu-ray now, runs parallel to the events that led to the fall of the Soviet Union and reiterates Communist ideals through the sport of hockey.

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BASE Jumping founder Carl Boenish was fearless, but Sunshine Superman makes the mistake of taking the emphasis away from Boenish’s exciting, envelope-pushing film work to tell a story that doesn’t celebrate his cinematic risk-taking or convey the excitement of his skydiving stunts.

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It’s a shame that Van Damme isn’t a better actor, because his rugged, worn looks finally give him a unique dimension that he has always lacked as a performer. He, and perhaps, the film’s director, don’t seem smart enough to play off of his inelegant appearance.

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The most notable thing about The D-Train, opening in theaters today, is Jack Black’s transformation into a desperate loser who cannot express the repressed feelings of love that he has for an old high school friend.

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You can’t blame Laugh Killer Laugh for reaching hard to come across as a gritty crime film in the vein of numerous East Coast crime movies, because the film achieves a kind of off-kilter genuineness that only certain B-movies can achieve.

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Two new DVD releases from Music Box Films explore unusual communities. Happy Valley shows the collective denial of a community shaken by accusations of abuse against one of its most prominent members, while Antarctica: A Year on Ice romanticizes a group that chooses to live far from civilization.

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