Nick Spacek

‘We Are Little Zombies,’ the debut from writer/director Makoto Nagahisa, is simultaneously nihilistic, adorable, and emotionally touching.

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Given that the cast is essentially Nevin, Mortimer, and Heathcote for the majority of ‘Relic’, it hinges almost entirely on the performances of the three actors and the mood created by a dark country house gone ever-so-slightly to seed.

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This rock doc fails to look more closely at 70s rocker Suzi Quatro’s influence on the current crop of musicians out there – but it still doesn’t stop ‘Suzi Q’ from being entertaining.

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The scope of ‘Homewrecker’ might be narrow, but it results in an intense focus.

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The sheer number of creative ways in which writer/director Jeffrey McHale uses footage for this retrospective movie documentary makes it the new gold standard of the genre, taking a movie you’re likely already biased against and leaving you feeling like you might just love it.

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Think of ‘The Wretched’ as the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of horror: you’re unlikely to be surprised by what you’re getting, but you’ll certainly take it in without any complaint.

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Dan Bush’s ‘The Dark Red’ is definitely watchable, but almost infuriating in how little it seems to regard its tonal shifts. Rather than “yes, and,” it chooses instead to go for “and then,” switching from one genre to another, choosing to keep the various aspects distinctly and ineffectively separate.

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While these docs all stand on their own, as binged series, the interconnectedness of all these titles, genres, and personages come together in a very gratifying way.

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Kirill Sokolov’s ‘Why Don’t You Just Die!’ is an astonishingly well-constructed piece of filmmaking, and the sort of movie destined to become necessary viewing for anyone who likes a chuckle with their shotgun blasts.

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Marc Meyers’ heavy metal horror flick ‘We Summon the Darkness’ starts strong, but soon turns into a standard stalk-and-slash.

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What makes ‘Extra Ordinary,’ out March 6, work so well is that it’s a haunting comedy, which allows for subversion of so many tropes.

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‘Guns Akimbo’ may become better known as “that movie where Harry Potter has guns bolted to his hands,” and that’s a pretty apt elevator pitch of the movie.

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If you’re a fan of genre cinema, actor Munro Chambers is a rising star. He appeared in one of the best small-ensemble black comedies we’ve seen in years, ‘Harpoon,’ wherein his character undergoes transformations both physical and emotional, really making for a bleakly hilarious viewing. We spoke with Munro Chambers by phone about his career, and the intricacies of ‘Harpoon.’

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Richard Stanley’s adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s ‘Color Out of Space’ teeters on the edge of greatness many times, but never fully commits to its cosmic horror.

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‘The Wave’ is a visually impressive trip, but ultimately a very hollow experience.

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