Nick Spacek

Writer/director Garin Hovannisian’s Truth to Power, a new documentary on System of a Down frontman Serj Tankian, will likely entrance fans of the band looking to get an in-depth tale of the politically-active singer and musician, but anyone else in search of a focused tale will find the film desperately lacking.

{ 0 comments }

The latest film from Adam Egypt Mortimer, ‘Archenemy’ (out February 16 on DVD and Blu-ray from RLJE Films), sees the writer/director once again applying his independent lens to a new genre.

{ 0 comments }

The debut feature from writer/director Adam Stovall, ‘A Ghost Waits,’ now streaming via Arrow, follows on the heels of last year’s acquisition by the venerable genre company of another left-of-center, oddly quirky, black and white fun take on genre cinema, The Lake Michigan Monster.

{ 0 comments }

Were it not for the fact that it’s drenched in violence, blood, and assorted alien fluids, the heart of ‘Psycho Goreman’ makes it charming enough to watch with your kids.

{ 0 comments }

It’s great to see that the rockers featured in the documentary really seem to enjoy getting to interact with fans on this level, where they’re kinda / sorta peers, but even those interviews come across more as advertising fodder for the camp, rather than digging deeply into what it means for them personally.

{ 0 comments }

‘The Beach House’ is absolutely one of my favorite horror films of the year, so I was thrilled to get a chance to hop of the phone with director/writer Jeffrey A. Brown to discuss how this excellent piece of small-budget terror came to be.

{ 0 comments }

There’s a lot to take from Steve Byrne’s ‘The Opening Act,’ but the main takeaway is if you’re willing to take a chance, enjoy it while it lasts, rather than worrying about what happens if it doesn’t go exactly as planned.

{ 0 comments }

Director Andre Gower’s effusive documentary, ‘Wolfman’s Got Nards,’ about the 1987 cult horror flick ‘The Monster Squad’—which he starred in as a kid—will please die-hards.

{ 0 comments }

Mondo Macabro’s latest double-feature Blu-ray features two films from French director Jean Louis Van Belle – 1971’s The Lady Kills and 1972’s Pervertissima.

{ 0 comments }

‘Class Action Park’ is tonally all over the place, but ultimately an entertaining doc on an unusual subject.

{ 0 comments }

‘Skin: A History of Nudity in the Movies’ is a fascinating and illuminating look at how social mores have changed, as well as how the industry itself treats the subject. Therefore, it was really great to speak with director Danny Wolf Wolf about his recent spate of work, and the art of presenting underrepresented topics onscreen.

{ 0 comments }

Jay Baruchel’s ‘Random Acts of Violence’ is a steady stream of unpleasant encounters which alternate between teeth-grinding interpersonal interactions and blunt physical violence.

{ 0 comments }

‘Murder in the Woods’ is a standard mainstream slasher, which means that, while the multicultural casting is something new, the way in which the cast is utilized isn’t.

{ 0 comments }

In ‘The Rental,’ the acting’s competent, the score ups the tension fairly effectively, and the game of waiting to see whose secrets and failures will be discovered (and how) is entertaining enough.

{ 0 comments }

This is a movie which could’ve been fun, but ‘Coven’ fails because it takes all of the tropes of the witch movie and only looks at the surface for its inspiration.

{ 0 comments }