Nick Spacek

Watching ‘Woman Chasing the Butterfly of Death’ unfold on Blu-ray is as close as I’ve gotten to true insanity in a long while, but it’s not like the director just threw things at the screen to see what would stick.

{ 0 comments }

What’s appealing about ‘Bliss’ is the ride on which Begos takes the viewer, strapping them into the same hellbent train as the protagonist, parceling out the inevitable reveal in a string of hallucinatory visuals.

{ 0 comments }

Three best friends find themselves stranded on a yacht in the middle of the ocean in the effective Poe abstraction ‘Harpoon.’

{ 0 comments }

‘MOMO: The Missouri Monster’ is a fairly fun, low-budget, pseudo-documentary grindhouse homage.

{ 0 comments }

The sheer audacity of crafting a zombie film wherein the camera never stops rolling is impressive.

{ 0 comments }

Larry Fessenden’s ‘Depraved’ has its flaws, but the ways in which it succeeds are so marvelous and inventive, it’s worth looking past them to see a movie which manages to be fresh while treading very, very familiar ground.

{ 0 comments }

Sheets’ gorefest doesn’t wink to its audience, which is a major plus for ‘Clownado.’ While its audience might be small, those who want to see the film won’t be disappointed. Other more casual fans might find it wanting.

{ 0 comments }

There’s a great need for the occasional bright-eyed, positive-message bit of trash cinema that is ‘The VelociPastor.’

{ 0 comments }

Tilman Singer’s ‘Luz’ is a brilliant debut. It manages to be two things simultaneously. It’s most prominently the sort of film which makes you excited for the future with what it does on such a small budget and scale.

{ 0 comments }

‘Don’t Look,’ billed as a “unique, female-directed twist on horror films,” doesn’t break any new ground in the world of slasher horror, but for a first feature, it’s really solid.

{ 0 comments }

While this might be least-known of director Jack Hill’s efforts, even within the pantheon of work he did for Corman’s New World Pictures, it’s definitely worth a closer look.

{ 0 comments }

Vinegar Syndrome’s DVD release of the 1969 Nazisploitation/sexploitation flick The Cut-Throats — limited to 1,500 copies — is a very basic one. It has a 2k restoration, along with the original trailer, and that’s about it.

{ 0 comments }

Adam Rockoff’s new book, The Horror of It All is part memoir, part editorial, and part collection of lists. However, it all combines into a cohesive read that offers up the author’s views on any number of horror films, types, and tropes.

{ 0 comments }

Despite being billed as being from “master of Filipino sleaze, Cirio Santiago,” the exploitation flick “The Muthers” is surprisingly good-natured.

{ 0 comments }

If you’re looking to get beyond Sergio Leone’s Man with No Name films and want to explore the world of Italian Western cinema, this is an excellent start. As part of Arrow’s first batch of releases here in the United States, they’ve managed to hit it right out of the park.

{ 0 comments }