Brett Steinbrink

The Imitation Game is an enjoyable and well-done biopic that lacks a certain intangible hook which holds it back in my mind from a Best Picture nomination, despite some of the nods it has already gotten.

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The third and final entry in The Hobbit trilogy is by far the strongest of the three. It gives a faithful and lovingly-crafted foray into Middle Earth for fans of the book and new fans alike, while being able to incorporate lore from other writings of Tolkien into the mix and tying all six films together as a unit, binding them with common story elements and ties to each other.

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[Rating: Minor Rock Fist Up] Ever shopped at WalMart, cheered for the Dallas Cowboys, or eaten at KFC? There’s a little bit of shame in your personal knowledge that you probably did so willingly, and would probably do so again. That’s kind of how I felt about Drive Hard (Available now on DVD and Blu-Ray), the newest [...]

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Written and directed by Ruben Östlund, Force Majeure has been selected as the Swedish entry for Best Foreign Language Film at the 87th Academy Awards in February 2015. Unfortunately in my humble opinion, the film fails to really engage the viewer in any meaningful discussion or portrait of a family in the midst of crisis, and leaves you not with a feeling of conclusion, but with confusion.

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[Rock Fist Way Down] It’s hard to say a lot about a kids’ movie as straightforward as Under Wraps (Available now on DVD), so I’m not even going to sugarcoat it for you today. Danny is always getting into trouble and breaking things, despite his good intentions, so when his parents tell him not to [...]

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Fury walks the line between romanticizing arguably the most important war of the past century and making you appalled that anyone ever went through such an experience voluntarily in what we’ve come to call the last great American crusade against the forces of tyranny.

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The Two Faces of January brings three solid performances together to help a decent script turn into an hour and a half of quite entertaining film.

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Jackpot‘s visually a lot of fun to watch. You know just by looking at the cover of it that it’s got to be a dark comedy of some form, and it delivers on that note spectacularly.

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What do you get when you combine the convoluted plot of a movie you’ve probably already seen with one of the most hilariously enigmatic actors of our time? If you guessed Rage out August 12th on DVD and Blu-Ray starring Hollywood-oddity Nicolas Cage, you probably guessed right.

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Writer/director Andrew Levitas delivers an inconsistent story of a young man dealing with his father’s decision to give up his struggle with cancer.

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The film tells us that “Love always comes with a price,” and because I love film, sometimes that price is watching a really bad movie.

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Roger Michell’s charming film Le Week-End, out on DVD now, explores the relationship between Meg (Lindsay Duncan) and Nick (Jim Broadbent), who are on their 30th wedding anniversary in Paris, where they also spent their honeymoon.

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In Game of Thrones, she plays miniature badass Arya Stark, who fears no man and has a comeback for every insult thrown her way. But in Heatstroke, Williams gets to show her versatility as a young actress and convincingly plays troubled youth Jo,

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In the same way that the judge in Devil’s Knot dismisses the inconsistent testimony of one young man accused of murder, it’s easy to dismiss the movie for its huge number of inconsistencies and jumps in logic that disallow the viewer to get wrapped up in what is truly a compelling and gruesome narrative.

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Generation War provides a German perspective on the events of World War II through the eyes of five young people who experience the war in profoundly different ways.

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