July 2013

Anniversaries are hit and miss in the Godzilla universe, but this overlooked entry (obscured by remakes and awkward chronological positioning) is one of the best.

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The Kansas City Art Institute and Alamo Drafthouse have joined forces to bring you Film School, a weekly student curated film series. This week – The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) – Saturday, August 3rd at 2:00 p.m.

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Here’s my KCTV5 review with clips from ‘The Wolverine,’ as well as my capsule print review from Lawrence.com.

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It’s here! Trevan and Eric celebrate their 100th podcast with a look back at their favorite moments. And when they’re done looking back, they review some movies!

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V/H/S/2’s attempt to try and provide an overarching narrative that proves to be its biggest downfall, for two reasons. First, the multiple parts that make up this connective short film are easily the worst of this anthology. The second reason is that these “found VHS tapes” obviously don’t exist in the same universe.

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Any way you look at it, Grant’s shooting is an awful tragedy, and debates about the whether the amount of time served by the man who shot him was enough (11 months of a 2-year sentence) are completely warranted. Coogler’s intention, however, for this film is clear: to give voice and dignity to Oscar. This isn’t the story of two people and their chance trajectories ending in tragedy. It’s the story of the victim.

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There’s a big difference between what should be funny and what’s actually funny.

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Listen to Eric Melin and I argue about The Wolverine on Scene-Stealers Podcast #100. Hugh Jackman reprises the titular role that made him famous in The Wolverine, a movie that is simultaneously hampered by being forced to acknowledge the X-films that came before it, and helped by largely divorcing itself from the X-universe and telling its […]

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I know that there are very few people I could recommend Only God Forgives to, but I believe that it shows excellent craft and intentionality. It has forced me to ponder fruitfully topics I would normally avoid.

Be warned, Only God Forgives is for the emotionally and gastronomically stalwart. It is one of the best films I cannot, with a clear conscience, encourage others to see.

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The Kansas City Art Institute and Alamo Drafthouse have joined forces to bring you Film School, a weekly student curated film series. This week – River’s Edge (1987) – Saturday, July 27th at 1:00 p.m.

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Nicolas Winding Refn’s newest pairing with Ryan Gosling is a step in the wrong direction.

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Based on the comic of the same name, Ryan Reynolds and Jeff Bridges star in this amusing tale of undead cops working for the Rest In Peace Department.

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We’re back! And by “we,” I mean Eric Melin, Trey Hock, and Trevan McGee. There’s a lot to cover this week including a retroactive review of last week’s Pacific Rim, plus Trey and Trevan talk about Only God Forgives before Eric spills on A Hijacking and The Way, Way Back.

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Red 2 may have some fun moments, but the trainwreck of a sequel simply can’t hold enough good scenes together to keep the film from floundering through most of its nearly two-hour running time.

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The directing debut of Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, The Way, Way Back is a charming coming-of-age film that overcomes a lot of pitfalls of the genre because its protagonist is so beautifully inexpressive and uncomfortable to begin with that when he finally does make the small strides needed to come out of his shell, it feels like a huge triumph.

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