May 2013

The latest from M. Night. Shyamalan is light on twists … and pretty much everything else.

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This week, Alan Rapp subs for Trey to talk about After Earth with Trevan and Now You See Me with Eric.

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Besides being a stirring portrait of a youth culture in crisis, ‘Band of Outsiders’ is very charming and accessible — especially for anyone that’s experienced teen alienation.

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Currently playing at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, and in full release today, What Maisie Knew should be commended for breaking the traditional mold of children in movies. Indeed, while it isn’t always pretty, the film at least has the courage to commit to its message: the emotional and spiritual protection of children.

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There are two ways that an exercise like Now You See Me could have failed miserably, and it admirably succeeds on both counts.

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For those who are familiar with Noah Baumbach’s work, Frances Ha will thoroughly satisfy. For those not yet familiar with Noah Baumbach, allow Frances Ha to make the introductions.

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In the new film Now You See Me, Interpol detective Alma Dray (Mélanie Laurent) tells her partner that sometimes logic won’t solve the puzzle. Sometimes it takes a leap of faith.

If you can head this advice, then you might really enjoy Now You See Me.

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The story of a young husband and wife’s struggles through the personal and professional speed bumps encountered in most marriages during the early just-had-a-kid years, ‘A Song Still Inside’ opens today at SIFF 2013.

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Cullen Hoback’s new documentary, Terms and Conditions May Apply, holds that the proliferation of information via the Internet is being used to bilk people and, worse, rob them of their freedoms.

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The practical effects and location shooting only further enhance and lend gravitas and a sense of authenticity to The Deep. Having played at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival, it’s in the running for the best film going at that event this year.

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Pierre Etaix mastered an almost wordless, deadpan comic delivery in the Buster Keaton vein and a deliberate pace that assured that his carefully planned gags came to fruition with a minimal amount of cutting. Criterion’s box set is a must-have for serious film fans.

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Henrik in The Almost Man is a perpetual man-child whose mid-life angst and rudderless existence is on par with anything Will Ferrell, Seth Rogen, or the like ever pulled off.

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The Kansas City Art Institute and Alamo Drafthouse have joined forces to bring you Film School, a weekly student curated film series. This week – Meatballs (1979) – Saturday, June 1st at 2:00 p.m.

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This is not something one might eagerly to recommend.  For a Peter Greenaway fan, yeah: this might be right up your alley.  For pretty much everyone else, prepare yourself for one of the weirdest, most obscene, nonsensical cinematic journeys of your life.

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The actors in each movie don’t have much to do, but at least one of these movies understands where its strength lies — in putting bodies in constant motion and thumbing its nose at the laws of physics.

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