September 2006

“The Science of Sleep” is the latest film from “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” director Michel Gondry. Gondry also wrote the screenplay for “Sleep,” creating a complete film experience that is as charming as it is bizarre. “Sleep” is a vibrant narrative in three languages and – as if that’s not enough to keep [...]

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It’s another slow Monday morning, and as I sit at my computer avoiding work, I think of the innocent idealism of Stephane (Gael Garcia Bernal), the young artist at the center of Michel Gondry’s fantastical new film, “The Science of Sleep.” If only my job could allow me an unconditional creative outlet. Returning to Paris [...]

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Eric met with “Flyboys” star James Franco last week to talk about the dangers of being a World War I pilot and get the scoop on the upcoming “Spider-Man 3” movie! (Warning: “Spider-Man 3” spoilers ahead, beware!) Quicktime users click here.

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One of the funniest parts of “Jackass Number Two” is the warning at the beginning that states that all stunts were “performed by professionals.” In the strictest sense of the word, I guess anybody who gets paid thousands of dollars to chug an entire beer through his butthole is a professional. Using that criterion, that [...]

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Watching Howard Hughes’ “Hells Angels” fleet of biplanes speed recklessly across the sky in the 2004 Hughes biopic “The Aviator,” I remembered thinking that there is a great movie waiting to be made about World War I pilots at the dawn of aviation. “Flyboys” is not that movie. It is set in 1917 and features [...]

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Eric and J.D. review Brian De Palma’s neo-noir thriller “The Black Dahlia” and discuss its relevance to Bret Michaels and Poison with a straight face. Scary. Click on the photo for the Windows Media version of this on-camera review.

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“It’s like, how much more black could this be? And the answer is none. None more black.” Nigel Tufnel from Spinal Tap may have been talking about the color of his new album, but he may as well have been talking about “The Black Dahlia.” By definition, film noir is black. Pitch black. Some argue [...]

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For his first lead role since the 2004 surprise hit “Garden State,” Zach Braff is back with “The Last Kiss,” a melodrama about impending adulthood that is seriously lacking in laughs. Unlike “Garden State,” though, which defined ennui for the post-emo college crowd, this remake of recent Italian film “L’Ultimo Bacio,” was not written or [...]

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“The Black Dahlia” is an exciting and epic film noir from director Brian DePalma (“Carlito’s Way,” “Dressed to Kill”). This adaptation of James Elroy’s classic novel is a virtual movie making clinic from DePalma who fills each scene with intense and inspired camera work and vibrant performances from four of modern-day Hollywood’s finest up-and-comers. If [...]

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George Reeves was an Average Joe. A struggling actor whose apparent suicide in 1959 suddenly made his unremarkable tale a whole lot more intriguing, Reeves reluctantly took the role of Superman on TV after a series of false starts at a serious movie career. The actor in a similar career slump these days who portrays [...]

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Neil LaBute is the director responsible for dark themed movies like “Nurse Betty” and “Your Friends and Neighbors.” His latest effort “The Wicker Man,” is a remake of the 1974 horror film of the same name. LaBute’s up-close-and-personal style has made the new film an articulate psychological thriller that looks and feels contemporary, even while [...]

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